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4 Interior Design Myths Busted.

Everyone has an opinion about interior design rules; things you should and shouldn’t be doing in your space (they’ve been doing the rounds for years now). I’m busting four of these design myths on the blog today to show you that sometimes, even the pros get it wrong!

Design Rules - Small Space Dark Walls

The ‘use white in a small space to make it look bigger’ myth.

Abigail Ahern said it best when she declared “A small room is a small room. Painting it pale is not going to double its size or even make it look marginally bigger”.

In a small space, furniture and its placement is probably the most crucial factor you should be concerned about. I also think that if a space is small and cosy, embrace that it’s small and cosy! There’s no point trying to make a Danny DeVito an Arnold Schwarzenegger – it’s just not going to work.

The kitchen above is a perfect example of realising that a space is small and rocking it out regardless. How bold and dynamic is this room? Imagine it is was an all-white snooze-fest!

Design Rules - Blue and Green Homewares

The ‘blue and green should never be seen’ myth.

I don’t think there are any colours that shouldn’t or can’t play well together. It’s simply a matter of proportion and scale. Blue and green are both on the cold side of the colour wheel, and as such they make for an incredibly cool combination in any room.

The tone of the green and blue is also important. Indigo and lime, for example, are so stunning together I recommend they get married and have babies.

So don’t let anyone tell you that certain colours can’t mix. It’s all about how you implement them in your home and what you ground the hues with.

Design Rules - The Rule of Three

The ‘rule of three in vignettes’ myth.

The myth that styling a vignette is all about using three pieces (or an odd number, for that matter) is just plain silly. In fact, I think vignettes are completely ruleless and should reflect your own sense of style – and what you love.

When I cluster homewares together, I simply ensure the height of each item is different, so your eye hops from one to the other. This, dear Creatives, is how you create a visual story. Whether that story involves three or 14 pieces is entirely up to you.

Live on the edge, I say, and make your vignette a rule-breaker.

Design Rules - Symmetry

The ‘symmetry in furniture and decor’ myth.

I love nothing more than mismatched bedside tables, or a photo frame that sits slightly above or below its brothers and sisters on the wall. This is what busting that symmetry myth is all about!

When I was growing up, rooms were all about symmetry; ensuring pieces mirrored one another for perfect balance. Nowadays, it’s all about mixing the space up and avoiding the mundane. 

The bedroom above is a perfect example of lack of symmetry, but what it does have is perfect balance. The heaviness of the bedside is balance by the frame on the other side of the bed, while the basket completes the look. This is visual harmony – and isn’t it divine?

Design Rules

Photo Credits: Image one via Stupic.com, two and four courtesy of West Elm and three via Burlap and Lace.

Outside of writing the TLC Interiors blog, Chris is an interior stylist and author. You can also catch him on your TV screens as a designer on Channel 10's Changing Rooms. If you'd like to book a design consult with Chris, you can find out more here

Comments (3)

  • N Stewart

    I go against the blue & green should never be seen rule, or myth as you say, and use them together to great effect in my home all the time as they are my two favourite colours.

    reply
  • Great post! I have always combined blue and green; in the right shades they look so gorgeous together. Tricia Guild (of Designers Guild) does blue and green oh so well! 🙂 As for following the rule of three in vignettes…pah! Almost NEVER!
    I’m really loving your blog by the way…just found you on Triberr, so now I’m off to follow you on other social media! 😉
    See you around!

    reply

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